‘We’ll meet again’: Queen recalls WWII song in bid to lift nation during coronavirus lockdown

Home UK ‘We’ll meet again’: Queen recalls WWII song in bid to lift nation during coronavirus lockdown
‘We’ll meet again’: Queen recalls WWII song in bid to lift nation during coronavirus lockdown

The Queen has drawn on her experience of wartime spirit to call on the country to "remain united and resolute" to overcome the coronavirus crisis.

In an historic address to the nation recorded inside Windsor Castle, the monarch said: "Together we are tackling this disease and I want to reassure you that if we remain united and resolute, then we will overcome it."

In a deeply moving and personal message, Her Majesty reflected on how difficult it is for many spending time apart during the coronavirus pandemic.

"We should take comfort that while we may have more still to endure, better days will return: we will be with our friends again; we will be with our families again; we will meet again," she said.

Image: The Queen left Buckingham Palace last month

In words that appeared to echo those of Dame Vera Lynn's famous Second World War song We'll Meet Again, the Queen drew on her own personal memories when she said: "The pride in who we are is not a part of our past, it defines our present and our future."

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The 93-year-old monarch was also quick to praise the work of those keeping the country going and putting their own lives at risk, saying: "I want to thank everyone on the NHS frontline, as well as care workers and those carrying out essential roles, who selflessly continue their day-to-day duties outside the home in support of us all.

"I am sure the nation will join me in assuring you that what you do is appreciated and every hour of your hard work brings us closer to a return to more normal times."

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And she praised the country for coming together to clap for the NHS on the last two Thursday evenings.

"The moments when the United Kingdom has come together to applaud its care and essential workers will be remembered as an expression of our national spirit; and its symbol will be the rainbows drawn by children," she said.

Staff from the Royal Liverpool University Hospital joining in
Britons salute NHS heroes

It was only the fifth address of its kind during her 68-year reign and it was also broadcast across the Commonwealth.

The Queen is head of state of 16 Commonwealth realms as well as head of the Commonwealth.

Reflecting on the worldwide nature of the COVID-19 outbreak, she said: "While we have faced challenges before, this one is different.

"This time we join with all nations across the globe in a common endeavour, using the great advances of science and our instinctive compassion to heal.

"We will succeed – and that success will belong to every one of us."

The Prince of Wales opened the new hospital...from his home in Scotland. Pic: Clarence House
Charles: NHS Nightingale is 'shining light'

The Palace has been keen to stress that these were the Queen's words, written with her close advisers, but Number 10 would have had sight of the address before it was recorded.

In a message the government would have been keen to see her reinforce, the Queen thanked those who have been staying at home to protect the vulnerable, using her own personal experience to get the message across.

"It reminds me of the very first broadcast I made, in 1940, helped by my sister," she said.

"We, as children, spoke from here at WinRead More – Source

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